view counter

Gregg Howard

Location

Various Indian Peoples Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 1540
Tahlequah, OK 74465-1540
United States
35° 54' 0.2664" N, 95° 2' 24.0288" W
Greg-Howard-and-Jane-Goodal.jpg
Business Name: 
Various Indian Peoples Publishing Co.

Storytelling has become a big part of my life. It enables me to tell people about the Cherokee - their history and culture. I can speak the language to them - teach them words and phrases - as I am telling the traditional Cherokee legends and stories.

Some of these legends have been told and retold for thousands of years - some are being shaped and refitted into our contemporary world. Stories from above - the sky and the birds, on the earth - the rivers, streams and animal stories, and out of the earth - stories of the plants and herbs. These stories become the essence of "why" the world is the way it is and teaches us the pulse and rhythms of Mother Earth and how to live in harmony.

Our mission is to record and promote the use of as many American Indian languages as we can. At present, working with tribes and nations all over the country, we are able to provide access to 15 American Indian languages. All of these language programs are in our catalog and are currently available.

Contact Phone Number: 
1-800-776-0842
Contact E-mail:: 
vipublish@earthlink.net
embeded_video: 
Display Location Information?: 
Yes

Introduction to Choctaw

Artist - Author: 
Gregg Howard

Over 2 hours with workbook. Endorsed by the Language Retention Committee of the Choctaw Nation as a valid laqnguage learning program. Elder Charley Jones describes the pronunciation of the language and teaches the Choctaw numbers, months, days of the week, animal names, food wordhttp://www.naotw.biz/node/1876/edits, asking directions and many useful phrases. Highly recommended.

Introduction to Cherokee

Artist - Author: 
Gregg Howard
Excerpted from Introduction to Cherokee by Gregg Howard, Kevin W. Smith, Richard L. Eby, Sam Hider. Copyright © 1990. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved The accelerating force for Cherokees in the early 19th century for education was the eight-six character written syllabary developed by Sequoyah in 1821.